Top State Dept. Officials Enabled Misconduct by Pompeo, Whistle-Blower Said

WASHINGTON — A State Department employee who reported witnessing misconduct by Secretary of State Mike Pompeo as well as hearing “numerous firsthand accounts” of such behavior was blocked from further addressing the issue by top department officials who were protecting Mr. Pompeo, according to a newly public copy of the employee’s whistle-blower complaint.

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Mueller defends Stone prosecution and says ‘his conviction stands’ in Washington Post op-ed

Mueller: “The jury ultimately convicted Stone of obstruction of a congressional investigation, five counts of making false statements to Congress and tampering with a witness. Because his sentence has been commuted, he will not go to prison. But his conviction stands.”

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Trump loses twice in Supreme Court on financial records cases but can keep fighting in lower courts

In two 7-2 decisions written by Chief Justice John Roberts, the Supreme Court ruled Thursday that Donald Trump does not have categorical immunity to withhold his financial records in a criminal investigation, nor can he withhold them from Congress. Both cases were sent back to lower courts for further proceedings, however, and are not immediate victories against Trump.

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Judge orders the release of children held in ICE detention facilities over risks from COVID-19

As the Times reports, Judge Gee’s order explicitly criticizes ICE over how shelters are not following guidelines issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The shelters have not made enough space for those being held to practice social distancing, or halted practices that put large numbers of detainees together. Neither the detainees nor staff at the facilities are consistently wearing masks despite CDC recommendations.

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House Judiciary committee hearing confronts Barr’s politicization of the DOJ

Barr’s handling of the Justice Department may be unprecedented, but so is the Republican reaction. Republicans in both the House and Senate have been protective of Barr and Trump’s ability to turn the DOJ into an extension of Trump’s personal legal team and to overlook its use as a political tool—just as they’ve defended Trump’s right to use pardons to reward friends with protection from absolutely justified convictions. 

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Who is Geoffrey Berman, the powerful US attorney refusing to step down?

Berman was an associate counsel in the Office of Independent Counsel during the Iran-Contra investigation, where he prosecuted a former CIA employee for tax fraud, before serving as an assistant US attorney in the Southern District of New York from 1990 to 1994.

During his first run as a US attorney, he handled criminal prosecutions involving tax securities and computer hacking violations, according to the department’s website.

He went on to practice in the private sector before helming the US Attorneys Office for the Southern District of New York. After Attorney General William Barr tried to oust him from that position late Friday, saying Berman was set to leave the office, Berman released a remarkable statement refusing to step down.

“I will step down when a presidentially appointed nominee is confirmed by the Senate,” Berman said. “Until then, our investigations will move forward without delay or interruption.”

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Geoffrey Berman abruptly resigns: Powerful US attorney in New York investigated Trump associates

Attorney General William Barr said in a statement that President Donald Trump intends to nominate Jay Clayton, the chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, to replace him.

Berman’s unexpected exit is likely to draw scrutiny inside the US attorney’s office and among career prosecutors.

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Newly released audio details 911 dispatcher’s concerns watching George Floyd arrest

When alerted to the officer’s troubling behavior, the supervisor responded that the officers did not tell him anything and that he would “find out” what was happening. BuzzFeed News noted that the Minneapolis Police Department’s policy requires officers to notify supervisors when force is being used outside of standard “takedown techniques,” or methods to bring a person to the ground during an arrest.

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